How To Place Facebook Friends In Friend Lists

How To Place Facebook Friends In Friend Lists

Facebook has a lot of incredible features for its users but most are often buried under the amount of things you can do on Facebook. One particular feature that is becoming more useful is the ability to organize and create friend lists. There are several benefits to using this feature and here is how you do it.

Creating And Filling Up A Friend List

Making lists on Facebook is nothing really new. In fact, you may have already seen what lists look like without creating one. These are called smart lists, lists that are automatically generated and filled based on the information you place on your profile and what the friends you have on Facebook have in common. Examples of these smart lists are things like work, family, city, and school.

But you can create your own with little to no worry. Here is how you do it:

  1. From the News Feed, click on Explore on the left hand side and find Friend Lists. If it’s not there, you may need to click on See More… and scroll to find it.
  2. Find Create List and click it.
  3. You’ll be given a pop up to give the list a name and also to include friends that you want to add to the list.
  4. Click Create once you’re done.

Also important to note is that you can create several lists. There isn’t a limit to how many you can make so if you’d like, you can be more specific to certain lists. What is also important to note is that you can freely add or remove individuals from those lists at any point in time.

Why Bother With This?

As the steps would suggest, there’s not really a quick way to add specific people. Furthermore if you’re looking to make a pretty large list, you’re going to have to spell out a lot of names. The task can be so arduous that many will ask what’s the point in all of this. What sort of benefits do you get from spending this much time making a handful of lists?

Well the biggest perk to this is deeper privacy. As I mentioned in a previous post regarding Facebook privacy tips, friend lists can help in permitting only specific individuals to seeing your posts. Maybe you have posts that you want only your friends and family to see. Making a friend list for that instance can help.

What’s also neat about this setup is that this also applies to your Stories. If you want Stories to be viewed by a specific group of people, then you can take advantage of this feature.

The only thing I’ll warn though is that it can get awkward if you use this feature regularly and decide to remove people from those lists. People will wonder why they can’t get access o your posts or stories and if it’s someone you know personally, they may bring that up.

Another distinct benefit is this can help in organizing your business. While having a Facebook page helps in personal branding, there are people who want to use their own profile to brand themselves. Being able to place their friends in specific lists can ensure that their friends don’t have their news feed filled with sales pitches or promotions all the time.

Friend Lists Help In Organizing Everything

Friend lists ultimately help in making your Facebook experience organized and safer. You can create a number of lists ensuring that people you don’t want to see specific posts get access to those particular posts.

It’s a rather long process to be building those lists, but they are worth it if you really value your privacy on the platform.

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6 Safety Facebook Tips To Protect Your Personal Information

6 Safety Facebook Tips To Protect Your Personal Information

Despite Facebook facing a heavy fine of $5 billion from the FTC over privacy issues, many users still use the platform. It’s a place where all of our friends and family are after all. So how can we visit Facebook while keeping our personal data secure? Well, your data can be safer when you follow these cybersecurity tips.

Facebook privacy

My first tip is to have a strong password. It’s an obvious one, but it’s still an issue today. For example, some of last year’s popular passwords consist of passwords like “qwerty”, “111111”, “12345”, and of course “password”. These are easy to get into and that’s the last thing you want. So do yourself a favour and make stronger passwords. One apps that can help you is LastPass. It’s free to use and can generate and store passwords for you so you don’t have to remember them. Those passwords are also locked by a master password which you’ll create and can only be accessed on your personal devices.

On the note of passwords, make sure your mobile gets a similar treatment. We use our smartphones a lot these days so if you ever lose it or your phone gets stolen, it’s harder for people to break into it if there is a passcode lock on it.

Another good tip in restriction is limiting who can see your posts. In the upper right-hand corner of every post you create, you can select who can see this post. It’s a general restriction, however you can restrict the view further by placing friends in friend lists.

If you want to feel more secure, another option is limit how many friends you add on Facebook. Make a personal rule to only add people you’ve met before or have chatted with will narrow who you accept as a Facebook friend. This will protect you from potentially accepting people who could wish you harm or also view your confidential posts (such as when you’re away from your home on vacation and no one is there…).

The tip above also applies to apps too. There are thousands of them and some of them were malicious in the past. Some users had their accounts hijacked or they were spamming other users. There are safety protocols put in place now, however it is worth looking over the apps and see what it is you are giving them access to before downloading.

The last tip is one that not many people have considered before and that’s backing up personal data. From the first day you created your Facebook account, you can grab that information. To access that information, click on “Account Settings” and look for “Download a Copy of your Facebook Data.” Why do this? Should anything happen to your account, you have better odds of recovering your account with this data.

These are some simple tips, but these are things that many overlook in their personal safety. So take these measures and you’ll feel safer while on Facebook.

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Easily create a free privacy policy. Every website needs one!

Easily create a free privacy policy. Every website needs one!

As transcribed from my video https://youtu.be/wXnRp9pb9TI

“It is important to have a privacy policy on your website due to Google ranking algorithm changes, GDPR, and to protect yourself.

Do you have a website? Do you have a privacy policy? Does it really matter? Google’s making this a part of the search engine ranking algorithm. And it’s becoming very important just to protect yourself. Think of the European Union GDPR that was pushed out last year.

Privacy Policy need Search Rank

You can go to the website https://www.freeprivacypolicy.com/, and it will create one for free, just like the name implies. It covers off things like GDPR, California Online Privacy Protection Act, the General Data Protection Regulation, Google AdWords requirements to have a privacy policy, personal identifiable information, the Federal Trade Commission, and fair information practices.

It has all these check-boxes that you go through when you generate your free privacy policy, spits it out, and it looks great. You can insert this into your website, and you’ve got yourself an instant privacy policy to help ensure that you’re protected, and also that you’re better ranked when it comes to Google.”

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Is it safe to use your credit card for online purchases

Is it safe to use your credit card for online purchases

As transcribed from my video: https://youtu.be/_43ytWh_mxM

“I get asked frequently about the security and safety of using credit cards for payment. There’s physical payments, where you’re actually in person making a purchase, and then online payments.

Is It Safe To Use Your Credit Card

Is It Safe To Use Your Credit Card

Let’s talk about physical payments. Is it safe to use tap versus putting the card in and having to type in my pin? My recommendation is anytime you have the opportunity to tap, that you tap your credit card, because no camera or person shoulder surfing, or cashier watching, or a little pin pad recorders, are all going to be not possible if you’re just tapping your credit card, and no, your pin code is not transmitted when you do a tap, it’s only the credit card number for doing the payment. You’re not giving away that confidential piece of information so that somebody could compromise.

Now let’s talk about online payments. Very different. Do you use your credit card online to make a payment? My recommendation is, I avoid it at all cost if I can. Unless it’s a very trusted source and I know that I am making a very secure connection. I’m not doing this in any internet cafes, and I’m not doing it over public WiFi sitting at Starbucks, Second Cup, or Tim Hortons, or some other coffee shop. What I’m doing is making sure that I am using a VPN connection. It’s a secured encrypted tunnel. I have a video on that if you want to go and look at my recommendations on VPN providers that you should use for virtual private networks. I’m also making sure that there’s that little lock symbol on my web browser. It says https and it says secure, to make sure that the information between my web browser and the web server at the other end is encrypted, and if I have a choice, I am not putting in my credit card number into that form.

What am I doing? I’m using some kind of tokenized payment system, like PayPal. That’s why I like PayPal because PayPal has the ability to do a one-time authorization of a payment to a vendor. They don’t get your credit card information. They cannot go and charge it again for other charges, unless of course, the vendor that you went and subscribed to has you doing a recurring payment by PayPal, and that’ll be very obvious to you. It’ll come up on the screen, and it’ll say, “Are you sure that you want to authorize a recurring payment for the current payment and future payments?” No, you want to make sure that you’re doing a one-time payment. If by chance you did a recurring payment on PayPal, you can go into your settings of your PayPal account, review all of the recurring payment merchants that have access to your account, and you can disable them. I do that very frequently. Probably once every month or two. I review everything on there, and I disable anything that is set for authorized access to my account, because, I want to make sure that I know and have control when I give out money from my account and make online payments.

Another idea to use gift cards, to use anything online where you’re not giving out your information of your card. That’s what bothers me is that credit cards are too easy to use and share. Once you know the credit card number, and you know the expiry date, generally speaking that’s enough, in a lot of cases, to go and make online purchases. The black market for credit card numbers is quite prevalent, and you want to make sure that you have enabled credit card alerts on your credit card as well, so that any time a charge goes through from your credit card that you get notified right away by email or text notification. Most credit cards allow this ability. I have enabled it on all my credit cards, and it tells me immediately. I could be sitting at a cashier right, and using my credit card and immediately I get an alert. It’s very quick. The reasoning that it’s good is because if something bad has happened, then you can immediately shut it down or call your credit card company and say that’s an unauthorized charge.

Another tip, use a second credit card for your online purchases. If you actually need to use a credit card, and you can’t tap it, and you can’t go and use something like PayPal or some other token based payment system, I would recommend that you have a second credit card with a low limit. The purpose behind that is if that credit card gets compromised, they can’t do much with it. It has a low limit. 500 or 1,000 dollars. Also, if you cancel that card, because it got compromised and you need to get another one, it doesn’t matter. It’s not going to affect you going and contacting all of your accounts that have preauthorized purchases. Also perhaps you’re traveling. When you travel and you need to use a credit card for payment, which I would be very careful with when you’re in a country that is unknown to you, again, you could use your second online credit card for those purchases that are questionable because, again, if it gets compromised, it’s not your main credit card that has all your preauthorized payments associated with it.

These are some tips that you can use if you are doing physical, in-person credit card payments or online purchases or you’re traveling in another country, or if it’s unknown to you because you want to make sure that you safeguard yourself against the inconveniences of dealing with a compromised credit card.”

 

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Got kids? Have you enabled parental controls and prevented them from using up all your mobile data?

Got kids? Have you enabled parental controls and prevented them from using up all your mobile data?

Many families are providing phones to their children so you can stay in touch and keep up with the times. Typically these are added to a family plan where all devices share the same monthly data. With this great power comes great responsibility, many children (and adults) don’t understand mobile vs wifi data or get addicted to their phones during times they should be sleeping or doing their homework.

There are several solutions available, some you can implement in combination with each other for very effective controls.

Screentime
iOS and Android

Manage the time your kids spend on their tablets and smartphones.

You can easily set daily time limits, reward additional time with completed tasks/homework, block schedules like sleep time and homework, immediate pause, approve new apps, see which apps are used the most, and access their web history.

NetGuard
Android

More advanced to block Internet access on a per app basis. You can restrict YouTube if not on WiFi or only allow Maps/Hangout access. NetGuard displays all of the apps in alphabetical order and next to each one is a toggle for WiFi and mobile data. Disable access to whichever one you like.

NetNanny
Android, iOS, Desktop

Block apps, filter websites, block and mask out profanity & pornography, monitor their time usage and social media, provide you with alerts and reporting.

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Are advertisers tracking you? Here’s how to control them.

Are advertisers tracking you? Here’s how to control them.

Have you recently visited a website to take a quick look at something and then got bombarded with ads from that company anywhere you go?  Advertisers who use the Google Ads platform can track you on Google, YouTube, and any of their ad partners through apps and websites.

You can control this through Google Ad personalization by clicking on this link (requires you to be logged into your Google account):

www.google.com/settings/u/0/ads

You will likely have an Aha moment upon clicking on this link and recognizing many of the advertisers that have been tracking you.  There you have the ability to turn off many of the advertisers if they aren’t relevant to what you search for online.

 

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