Preparing your online social legacy

We caution our children about the digital paper trails we leave. We need to be aware of what gets posted online, who can see it, and how things can be easily taken out of context. Another problem that is starting to manifest itself is our online legacy. What happens to our social media accounts when we pass away? Can our family access them or are they simply online forever stuck in limbo?

Important facts about encryption on smartphones

Important facts about encryption on smartphones

With recent security and privacy issues resulting from the San Bernardino iPhone dispute, it’s a good time to learn more about encryption.

What is encryption?

Basically encryption is a method used to secure information stored on any electronic device. This includes data such as text messages, photos, emails, and documents on smartphones.

When data is “encrypted,” it means it’s in a scrambled format, which makes it unreadable for computers or people without a key (such as a PIN code or passphrase) to the device.

It’s actually more complex than simply requiring a PIN code – Apple for example, requires several pieces of information in order to access data within the device. In addition to a PIN code or a fingerprint required from the user, there is also a key embedded in the device’s processor (secure enclave), which is unknown to anyone.

How to customize your phone’s lock screen

How to customize your phone’s lock screen

In earlier smartphone models, a lock screen was simply just that – a screen that popped up whenever you needed to unlock your phone.

Today, lock screens in the latest smartphone models are equipped with all sorts of features; allowing you to interact with notification alerts, add emergency information, access your phone’s camera and more, all without unlocking your phone.

Here are a few ways to customize your phone’s lock screen:

Why Apple made antivirus iOS apps unavailable

Why Apple made antivirus iOS apps unavailable

In March 2015, Apple cracked down on antivirus apps, pulling a huge number of them from the App Store. Many believe the reason behind this move is to eliminate concerns about whether or not iOS devices are susceptible to virus and malware attacks.

One of the apps removed from the App Store indicated it was a virus barrier. Apple informed them that the app’s description was “misleading” and could potentially lead customers to believe that viruses are present in iOS.

Why is Apple so confident in their ability to protect against vulnerabilities?